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Tuesday, July 28, 2009

Crochet Abbreviations

Crochet patterns use a large variety of abbreviations. Here are the most common and what they mean:

YO or yo (Yarn Over)- To yarn over means to bring the yarn over the hook of your crochet hook so that the hook can catch the yarn and draw it through the loop. Literally, bring the yarn over the hook.
ch-chain stitch
sc- single crochet
hfc- half double crochet
dc- double crochet
tc_ treble (triple) crochet
st(s)- stitch(es)
sl st- slip stitch
sk- skip
dec- decrease
inc- increase
sc2tog- single crochet two stitches together
lp(s)-loop(s)
rnd(s)-round(s)
dtr-double treble crochet
sp(s)-space(s)
beg-beginning
rep-repeat
tog-together
rs-right side
lp st-loop stitch
ws-wrong side
BLO or BL-Back Loop Only - Back Loop
FLO or FL-Front Loop Only - Front Loop
CC-contrasting color
Rev-Reverse
MC-main color

To begin crocheting, you have to tie the yarn to your crochet hook with a slipknot. You wrap the yarn around the hook, bringing the end portion of the yarn on top into a working loop. Then you “yarn over” by bringing the bottom thread over the hook so that the hook can catch it, twisting, and pulling it through the loop. You don’t want to pull the slipknot too tight. It has to be at least large enough to let the hook pass easily through it.

Crochet Gauge

When you learn to crochet, gauging can be one of the most confusing tasks. What is crochet gauge? Simply, your are figuring how many stitches and rows are in an inch. Gauge is something you have to figure for your crochet style. Patterns will give you a gauge for a project. You need to determine if your style will produce those same results. If not, experiment with larger or smaller hooks until you achieve the proper gauge. Gauge is the measurement from a starting point to an ending point. The easiest way to determine your gauge is to crochet a swatch of the pattern stitches you will be using in your project. A 4X4 inch swatch should be sufficient to estimate your gauge.

The designer of a pattern will create a gauge by default, just by the weight of the yarn and the size of the hook they use. Gauge is also determined by your tension, how tight or loose you hold your yarn when crocheting. Gauge determines the finished size of your project. If your gauge is too small, try a hook one size larger. If it is too big, use a smaller one.

Say you have a pattern that calls for a "J" hook and a 4-ply yarn. You have a 3-ply yarn you like and want to use a "H" hook. You will need more stitches across the pattern because these are smaller. You will need to determine how many stitches you will need to do to achieve the measurements in the pattern. You need to get the width right at the beginning so you don't end up ripping out your work. Gauging your work is especially important if your project is a clothing item.

Happy Crocheting!!

Beth

Crochet Hook Conversion Chart

CROCHET HOOKS
U.S.
B-1
C-2
-D-3
E-4
F-5
G-6
H-8
I-9
J-10
K-10-1/2
N
P
Q
METRIC - MM
2.25
2.75
3.25
3.5
3.75
4
5
5.5
6
6.5
9
10
15


STEEL CROCHET HOOKS
U.S.
00
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
METRIC - MM
3.5
3.25
2.75
2.25
2.1
2
1.9
1.8
1.65
1.5
1.4
1.3
1.1
1
.85
.75

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